Medical Examiner - e-Learning for Healthcare
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This programme is in partnership with...
  • College of Emergency Medicine
  • Royal College of Physicians
  • Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecoloists
  • Department of Health
  • RCPCH
  • Royal College of General Pracitioners
  • The Royal College of Psychiatrists
  • Royal college of Pathologists
  • The Royal College of Surgeons of England
  • Academy of Medical Royal Colleges

About the Medical Examiner programme

Medical Examiner is an e-learning project commissioned by the Department of Health and delivered by the Health Education England e-Learning for Healthcare programme (e-LfH) and the intercollegiate Working Group on Training for Medical Examiners. The project supports the implementation of the Government’s reform of the process of death certification in England and Wales. This course will help to deliver the majority of the essential training required for newly appointed Medical Examiners.

The training modules will train Medical Examiners in conducting independent medical scrutiny of cause of death, in providing advice on the process of referral to the coroner and, where invited, in providing medical advice to coroners themselves.

The legislative framework for implementing these important reforms is included in the Coroners and Justice Act 2009.

For more information on the death certification process please visit the Department of Health website.

About the Medical Examiner programme

Most of the material that you are about to access is entirely relevant to current practices surrounding death and interacting with the bereaved.

However, its key purpose is to provide learning for the new system of death certification for England and Wales, introducing a medical examiner role that has not yet been implemented.

A public consultation on introducing medical examiners to a reformed death certification process in England and Wales, closed in June 2016. A Government response to the consultation is expected to be published by spring 2017. Updates will be posted on this site.

This course does not include anything about current processes and forms to allow cremation, because the special processes for cremation will be abolished once the new system is implemented.

If you are a doctor considering applying to become a medical examiner, you can find out a great deal about the role here. But be aware that nearer the time you may have to repeat the e-learning to qualify for the job, because e-learning undertaken too far in advance may not be accepted by employers.

Programme background

In response to a number of public inquiries, most notably the Inquiry into the murders committed by Harold Shipman, the Government is reforming the process of death certification in England and Wales.

These reforms include the recruitment of up to 500 Medical Examiners across England and Wales who will mostly work part time. The role of the Medical Examiner will be to conduct independent medical scrutiny of cause of death in all cases where the death is not subject to coronial investigation. Medical Examiners will also be the primary source of general medical advice to coroners.

The Medical Examiner e-learning training programme will deliver much of the training required for this new working role. These requirements are specified in the Medical Examiner training curriculum developed by the intercollegiate Working Group on Training for Medical Examiners.

The Medical Examiner e-learning training programme will be split into eight modules with approximately 90 learning sessions in total.

Department of Health Death Certification Reforms - Coroner update

A definitive implementation date will be confirmed following intelligence-gathering workshops involving local authorities. Further activity on implementation and the pace of these activities will be informed by a confirmation of the implementation date.

The medical examiner’s role will be to scrutinise and confirm the cause of death in all cases not investigated by a coroner, regardless of the form of disposal. The medical examiner service will work closely with the coroner service to ensure that only appropriate deaths are referred to coroners.

WHILST ACCESS TO ALL THE E-LEARNING IS FREELY ACCESSIBLE THROUGH THIS PORTAL, PLEASE NOTE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED FOR PROOF OF COMPLETION (MEDICAL EXAMINERS AND MEDICAL EXAMINER OFFICERS).

Executive Group

  • Julia Moore OBE

    National Director, e-Learning for Healthcare
  • Alan Ryan

    National Programme Director, e-Learning for Healthcare
  • Peter Furness

    Peter Furness

    Project Champion, past-President of the RC Path and Interim National Medical Examiner
  • Jim Fowles

    Jim Fowles

    Senior Policy Manager, Department of Health

Project Team

  • Alan Fletcher

    Alan Fletcher

    Lead Medical Examiner. Clinical Project Lead and Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Acute Medicine, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Jonathan Guy

    Project Manager, e-Learning for Healthcare
  • e-LfH staff - Simon Smith

    Simon Smith

    Lead Instructional Designer, e-Learning for Healthcare
  • Chris Cammack

    Chris Cammack

    Implementation Support, e-Learning for Healthcare

Module Editors

  • Emyr Benbow

    Emyr Benbow

    Senior Lecturer in Pathology, Manchester University
  • Christopher Dorries

    Christopher Dorries

    HM Senior Coroner
  • George Fernie

    George Fernie

    Senior Medical Reviewer, Scotland and Past President Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine, Royal College of Physicians

How to access

In order to access any e-LfH programme, you will need an e-LfH account. If you do not have one, then you can register by selecting the Register button below.

The Medical Examiner programme is currently free to anyone who has an interest in the new working role. In order to gain access to this programme, prospective users simply need to register by selecting the Register button below.

Register >

If you already have an account with e-LfH, then you can enrol on to the Medical Examiner programme by logging in to the e-LfH Hub, selecting My Account > Enrolment and selecting the programme. You can then access the programme immediately in the My e-Learning section.

The resource is aimed at clinicians and stakeholders involved in the process of death certification. The whole curriculum has been made available to anyone with an interest in the death certification process but in order to apply for the new roles of a Medical Examiner and/or a Medical Examiner Officer, candidates will be required to complete core sessions of the curriculum prior to interview and the whole of the course by the time they start work. It is a legislative requirement that the whole course is completed within one year of starting work so sessions completed in advance of one year will need to be repeated. The Learning Management System is configured to provide a certificate of course completion with timelines. Registration by users who intend to apply to be Medical Examiners or Medical Examiner Officers is therefore essential.

Please note the course is undergoing revision because of the interval between publication and implementation of the reforms; completion of the updated sessions will also be required before appointment because the latest consultation will invoke changes.

It is not necessary for other interested users and stakeholders to register to access the course.

The Role of the Medical Examiner

  • The Role of the Medical Examiner

    This session will provide the background to the medical examiner’s system in England and Wales, describing how the proposals came about, the implementation strategy and the timescales. The importance of independence will be discussed.    

Death Certification

  • The Medical Certificate of Cause of Death

    The information provided in this session will allow you, as a prospective medical examiner, to put this important document into context and understand why the medical certificate of cause of death needs to be completed conscientiously. 

  • Completion of the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death Part 1: Formal Section

    This session outlines the purpose of the medical certificate of cause of death and explains the completion of the formal part of the medical certificate of cause of death in detail.

  • Completion of the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death Part 2: Cause of Death

    Module 01/Death Certification/Completion of the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death Part 1: Formal Section explained how to complete the formal section of the medical certificate of cause of death. This session describes how to complete the rest of the certificate.

  • Completion of the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death Part 3: Scenarios

    This session will allow the doctor to consolidate the knowledge previously gained in respect to death certification and give them the opportunity to complete a number of medical certificates of cause of death (MCCDs).

  • International and National Regulations on Death Certification Part 1: Purpose

    This session outlines the international regulations on certification of cause of death and reporting mortality statistics. It also explains the roles of the World Health Organisation, the World Health Assembly and the UK government in relation to these regulations. In addition, it describes the development, updating and revision of the International Classification of Diseases and how this is used in mortality statistics.

  • International and National Regulations on Death Certification Part 2: Certification

    This session explains the role of the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in collecting and processing data from civil registration of deaths in England and Wales to produce mortality statistics that can be used at local, national and international levels for comparisons between areas and over time for all these purposes.

  • New Processes and Legislation Part 1: End-to-End Process

    This session describes the end-to-end process that includes the new arrangements for the certification and confirmation of the cause of death set out in the Coroners and Justice Act 2009. It also highlights how their implementation changes the previous arrangements which have been in place since 1926.

  • New Processes and Legislation Part 2: Who is Involved

    The information provided in this session will allow you, as a prospective medical examiner, to understand the roles and responsibilities of the participants in the new end-to-end process for death certification and registration.

  • New Processes and Legislation Part 3: Forms

    The information provided in this session will allow you, as a prospective medical examiner, to understand the forms that need to be completed to enable a death to be certified and registered correctly.

  • New Processes and Legislation Part 4: Statutory Legal Requirements

    The information provided in this session will allow you, as a prospective medical examiner, to understand the legislation on which the new process for death certification and registration is based.

  • New Processes and Legislation Part 5: Scenarios

    Successful completion of this session will allow you to demonstrate that you have a sound understanding of the new process for death certification and registration and the key activities of the medical examiner.

  • Medical Examiner's Officers Part 1: The Role of the Medical Examiner's Officer

    This session describes the role of the medical examiner's officer, outlining the different tasks he or she undertakes in relation to gathering and preparing information for the medical examiner's scrutiny, and the nature of their communications with others.

  • Medical Examiner's Officers Part 2: MEO's Contact with the Relatives of the Deceased

    This session outlines the role of the medical examiner’s officer in contacting the relatives of the deceased to discuss the medical cause of death and establish any concerns they may have related to this.

Death Registration

  • The Death Registration

    This session provides an overview of the death registration system in England and Wales where no inquest has been held.

Clinical Governance

  • Confidential Enquiries

    This session will outline the National Patient Safety Agency’s system of three confidential enquiries that assess the quality of patient care patients receive from the health service and how this clinical governance facility will apply to the medical examiner in his/her work within the PCT systems where he/she will function.

  • Investigating and Reporting Poor Performance Part 1: Recognition

    This is the first of two sessions that together will help you develop an understanding of what constitutes poor performance, by understanding the requirements of good medical practice and how poor performance may become apparent. You will also cover the causes of poor performance and how poor performance may be addressed.

  • Investigating and Reporting Poor Performance Part 2: Management

    This is the second of two sessions. This session explains how and when to report poor performance and how poor performance can be investigated and dealt with. It looks in particular at the role of employers and the General Medical Council (GMC).

  • Major Incidents and the Medical Examiner

    This session looks at how coroners work and their responsibilities in relation to major incidents. It also considers the coroner's interactions with other emergency response personnel and how the victims are identified.

  • Pandemic Influenza and the Medical Examiner

    This session will cover the anticipated effects of a pandemic on the death certification, cremation, and burial procedures in England and Wales. By the end of the session, the prospective medical examiner will have a clear understanding of his/her role in an outbreak of pandemic influenza.

  • Revalidation of Medical Examiners

    This session introduces revalidation, outlining who this initiative will affect, what is meant by relicensing and recertification, and how medical practitioners will be required to meet the requirements for revalidation.

Interacting with the Bereaved

  • The Bereavement office

    This session describes the primary function and different services that may be provided by a hospital bereavement office. It explains the potential impact of the medical examiner service on bereavement officers and the relatives they represent

  • Understanding Bereavement

    This session introduces current theoretical understanding of the experience of bereavement and how this assists in communicating with newly bereaved people.

  • Communicating with the Bereaved Part 1: Effective Telephone Communication

    This session considers the communication needs of people who are recently bereaved and how to respond to them. It focuses specifically on telephone interaction and the challenges that this presents.

  • Communicating with the Bereaved Part 2: Handling Challenging Situations

    This session introduces some of the situations in which communicating with bereaved people as a medical examiner may be more challenging and suggests ways of meeting these challenges.

Scrutiny

  • Medical Records Part 1: Ethical and Professional

    Ethical and professional guidance governing medical records and their confidentiality.

  • Medical Records Part 2: Legal

    Legal guidance governing medical records and their confidentiality.

  • Quality Standards

    This session describes the quality standards that apply to the provision of the Medical Examiner Service in England and Wales.

  • How to Scrutinise a Case

    This session describes the process by which a death should be scrutinised, including the key questions that need to be answered.

  • When Further Information Arrives Concerning a Non-reportable Death

    This session describes the actions that need to be taken when further information relating to the cause of death is revealed by an informant during or after scrutiny of a non-reportable death by the medical examiner.

  • Case Scenario: Unexpected Death in a Hospital Emergency Department

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session takes you through a hospital-based scenario of a case you are asked to review.

  • Case Scenario: Telephone Advice to a Junior Hospital Doctor

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records.

  • Case Scenario: When is Old Age Acceptable on an MCCD?

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a Medical Examiner. As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session takes you through a nursing home-based scenario of a case you are asked to review.

  • Case Scenario: Expected Deaths Outside Hospital Including Palliated Cases

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session takes you through an expected death in a palliative care patient managed at home, which you are asked to review.

  • Case Scenario: Post-operative Death Following a Blood Transfusion

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner (ME). As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. The session, takes you through a hospital-based scenario of a case you are asked to review.

  • Case Scenario: Death After Coronary Stenting

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner (ME). As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session, takes you through a hospital-based scenario of a case you are asked to review.

  • Case Scenario: GP Case Cause of Death not Justifiable by Circumstances

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session takes you through a scenario of a case you have been asked to review, where the deceased died within days of being discharged from hospital.

  • Case Scenario: Death with MRSA Suspicion

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner (ME). The session takes you through a case of a death of a patient with MRSA. As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records.

  • Case Scenario: Death Following Minor Fall

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. This session takes you through a death following a minor fall.

  • Case Scenario: Natural Death Given as an Either/Or

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session takes you through a hospital-based scenario of a case you are asked to review.

  • Case Scenario: Death of a Woman with Epilepsy

    This scenario, like the others in this module, enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. You do have access to some clinical records, however. This scenario concerns the sudden death of a young female with epilepsy, who is brought to the emergency department.

  • Case Scenario: Death of an Elderly Nursing Home Resident

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner (ME). As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session takes you through a nursing home-based scenario of a case you are asked to review.

  • Case Scenario: Natural Death Certified with Symptoms Only

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session takes you through the case of an elderly woman who died at home.

  • Case Scenario: Death from Natural Disease Following Refusal of Treatment

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner (ME). As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The scenario is concerned with the right of individuals to make informed choices regarding their care on religious grounds. This is covered by the Mental Capacity Act. To view an online version of the Act, go to www.direct.gov.uk and enter 'Mental Capacity Act' into their search facility.

  • Case Scenario: Death of an Elderly Lady

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session takes you through the death of an elderly lady in hospital.

  • Case Scenario: Suspicion of a Work Related Death

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner (ME). The session takes you through a case of a man who may have suffered from a work-related disease. A junior doctor is seeking your advice. As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records.

  • Case Scenario: Death Following Palliative Care

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner (ME). The session takes you through a case of a death of a patient receiving palliative care for a progressive hereditary condition. As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required.

  • Case Scenario: Death in Patient on Warfarin Modest Elevation of INR

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner (ME). As in 'real life' you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session, takes you through a scenario in which an elderly woman was found unconscious and brought into the Emergency Department in a comatose state.

  • Case Scenario: Death of a Child Known to Suffer from Cerebral Palsy

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner.
    As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session takes you through the case of a child who was found dead in bed at home, which you have been asked to review.

  • Case Scenario: Death of a Preterm Infant Delivered Alive Following Termination

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session takes you through the case of an infant death following a live birth resulting from a medical termination of pregnancy.

  • Case Scenario: Expected Death of a Child in the Community

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some clinical records. The session takes you through a community-based scenario about the death of a child.

  • Case Scenario: Death Following Police Contact

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some medical records. The session takes you through a case of a man who collapsed at home sometime after a visit from two police officers.

  • Case Scenario: Death Following Arrest and Hospital Attendance

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some medical records. The session takes you through a case of a woman who died after being held in police custody and reviewed at hospital.

  • Case Scenario: Death Dementia and Self-determination

    This scenario enables you to work through a real case as a medical examiner. As in 'real life', you may not initially have all the information required. However, you do have access to some medical records. The session takes you through a case of a death of a patient in hospital who was under supervision in the community because of allegations of neglect by her daughter.

The Body of the Deceased

  • Human Tissue Act 2004 Part 1: Overview

    This session provides an overview of the Human Tissue Act 2004 and the Human Tissue Authority, its codes of practice and issues of consent and licensing relating to the use and disposal of human tissue.

  • Human Tissue Act 2004 Part 2: Regulations for Post Mortems and Human Tissue

    This session expands on the introduction to the Human Tissue Act 2004 covered in session Have completed session Module 06/Body of the Deceased/The Human Tissue Act 2004 Part 1, covering regulations governing post mortem examinations and the storage, use and disposal of human tissue.

  • Tissue Donation and Organ Transplant Part 1: Introduction

    This session describes what the medical examiner needs to know about tissue donation and organ transplantation.

  • Tissue Donation and Organ Transplant Part 2: The Donation Process and Coronial Law

    This session highlights inter-professional working, the hierarchy of consent, the level of training the Human Tissue Authority require of practitioners and defines licensable activities.

  • Tissue Donation and Organ Transplant Part 3: The Role of the Pathologist

    This session explains the interaction between the donation process and the Human Tissue Act (2004). It also examines the factors affecting the decision-making process for professionals and families.

  • External Examination of the Body

    This session describes a practical approach to the examination of the body that covers post mortem changes, marks and injuries which may suggest referral to the coroner and possible further investigation by the police.

  • Implications of Serious Infectious Diseases

    This session describes what the medical examiner needs to know about the public health implications of serious infectious diseases (e.g. notifiable infections), and the arrangements for reporting notifiable and other serious infectious diseases

  • Post Mortem Examination Part 1: Consent

    This session explains the consent required for carrying out post mortem examinations that are not ordered by the coroner. It focuses on the procedures as defined by the Human Tissue Act of 2004.

  • Post Mortem Examination Part 2: Autopsy Practice

    This session describes what the Medical Examiner (ME) needs to know about the procedure of post mortem examination, and its limitations.

  • Post Mortem Examination Part 3: Investigations After the Autopsy

    This session indicates the various kinds of specimens that may be removed at post mortem examination in both consent and coroner's autopsies. This information may help the medical examiner (ME) to answer queries from relatives of the deceased.

  • Non-invasive and Minimally-invasive Post Mortems

    This session provides medical examiners with the background information necessary for informed discussions regarding the alternatives to traditional autopsy.

  • Disposal of the Body Part 1: Legal Disposal Methods

    This session provides an overview of the various possible methods of the legal disposal of the body, both past and present.

  • Disposal of the Body Part 2: Statues, Procedures and Limitations

    This session complements the session Disposal of the Body Part 1. It sets out the statutory and procedural requirements associated with body disposal and outlines the key limitations in the process.

  • Donating Bodies for Anatomical Examination

    This session describes the procedures for donating a body for medical science, what happens after the death of a potential donor, and what can often prevent a body from being accepted for anatomical examination.

  • Faith Considerations Part 1: Abrahamic Faiths

    This session explores Abrahamic faith considerations that medical examiners (and the Medical Examiners Service) will need to take into account to carry out a rigorous, consistent, proportionate and equitable scrutiny of the cause(s) of death certified by the attending doctor who prepares the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death.

  • Faith Considerations Part 2: Dharmic Faiths

    This session explores Dharmic faith considerations that medical examiners (and the Medical Examiner Service) will need to take into account to carry out a rigorous, consistent, proportionate and equitable scrutiny of the cause(s) of death certified by the attending doctor who prepares the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death.

  • Faith Considerations Part 3: Far Eastern Faiths

    This session explores Far Eastern faith considerations that medical examiners (and the Medical Examiner Service) will need to take into account to carry out a rigorous, consistent, proportionate and equitable scrutiny of the cause(s) of death certified by the attending doctor who prepares the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death.

  • Faith Considerations Part 4: Other Traditions

    This session explores other tradition faith considerations that medical examiners (and the Medical Examiners Service) will need to take into account to carry out a rigorous, consistent, proportionate and equitable scrutiny of the cause(s) of death certified by the attending doctor who prepares the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death.

Death of Children

  • The Law and Death of Children Part 1: Definitions

    This session covers the relevant legal processes and clinical scenarios when a child or baby dies unexpectedly. It also includes how to minimise the distress of the parents while adhering to the law.

  • The Law and Death of Children Part 2: Stillbirth Intrapartum and Neonatal Death

    This session defines the different types of deaths that can occur around birth and describes the pathology and procedures of the subsequent investigation.

  • The Law and Death of Children Part 3: Unnatural and Suspicious Circumstances

    This session covers the identification of signs of neglect, maltreatment and child abuse that may emerge while investigating the death of a child. It also looks at the protocol to be followed in such cases.

  • The Law and Death of Children Part 4: The LSCB and the Role of the Medical Examiner

    This session considers the possible role of the Local Safeguarding Children's Board in the death of children, and the procedures followed after the death of a child. Particular emphasis is given to the role of the medical examiner.

The Law and the Coroner

  • HM Coroner's Office Part 1: Office Structure and Remit

    This session will enable you to identify, and distinguish between, the roles of the key personnel in a coroner's office, irrespective of the framework or structure of that office.

  • HM Coroner's Office Part 2: Coronor's Right to Inquire

    This session will describe selected relevant legislation, case law principles, and practice pertaining to the work of the coroner, in terms of his/her possession of the body and ordering of a post mortem examination.

  • HM Coroner's Office Part 3: Coronor's Inquiry

    This session explains the legal basis for coroner’s inquests and legal principles governing their operation. It also considers the relationship between the coroner and the families of the deceased during this stage of the investigative process.

  • The Unnatural Death Part 1: Coronor's Jurisdiction

    This session provides a general overview of the legal concept of an unnatural death.

  • The Unnatural Death Part 2: Unnatural Originating Events

    This session introduces the learner to unnatural originating events such as a fall leading to bronchopneumonia or an earlier violent disturbance followed by a cardiac collapse.

  • The Unnatural Death Part 3: Neglect or Medical Care

    This session is an introduction to unnatural deaths, where there has been neglect or where the deceased was under medical care.

  • The Unnatural Death Part 4: Rare Cases

    This session examines rare cases that may be natural, or unnatural, and the importance of referral to the coroner.

  • Repatriation and Removal

    This session will enable you to identify the differences in practice and procedure when a body is brought into or taken out of England and Wales.

  • Reporting a Death to the Coronor Part 1: Duties of the Medical Examiner

    This is the first session in a series of seven that examine the medical examiner’s duty to report appropriate deaths to the coroner.

  • The Coronor's Investigation Part 1: The Coronor's Powers

    This session examines the legal framework relating to post mortems and the powers of the coroner to take possession of a body and order an investigation into the cause of death.

  • The Coronor's Investigation Part 2: The Investigative Process

    This session examines the remit of the coroner and the role of the pathologist in the investigative process.

  • Interim Session on Reportable Deaths

    This session outlines the likely legislation about which deaths should be reported to the coroner.

e-LfH is a Health Education England Programme in partnership with the NHS and Professional Bodies